My Blog
By CornerstoneMD
March 06, 2019
Category: Women's Healthcare
Tags: Fibroids  

Affecting over 80 percent of women by the time they reach age 50, fibroids are abnormal uterine growths that can cause great discomfort, heavy periods, and abdominal pain. Luckily, there is a number of treatment options available to the millions of women who suffer from this condition. Read on to learn more about fibroids and how your local OBGYN can help ease your symptoms!

Fibroid Background

As mentioned above fibroids are typically non-cancerous tumors that develop within the uterine line. Although it is officially unclear on what exactly causes them to grow, experts generally agree that fibroid growth is influenced by a few factors, including hormone production, family history, a history of pregnancy, and being overweight.

While some people with fibroids report feeling no effect from their presence, other women report a range of different symptoms, such as:

  • Heavy and extended menstrual flow

  • Trouble conceiving

  • Pelvis and lower back pain

  • Frequent urination

  • Painful intercourse

  • Abdomen swelling

If you suspect that you may have fibroids, schedule an appointment with your local OBGYN to undergo a pelvic exam.

Treatment Options

Once your gynecologist has discovered the presence of fibroids, a specific treatment plan can be crafted specifically for you based on your age, your fibroid size, and the overall status of your health. Some possibilities for mild fibroids include:

  • Acupuncture

  • Yoga

  • Massage

  • Applying heat to the areas that are experiencing cramps

  • Losing weight, if you are overweight

  • Dietary changes, such as avoiding meat and high-calorie foods

For more serious cases, hormone regulating medications such as Lupron will cause your estrogen to drop, and thus cause menstrual cessation and fibroid shrinkage. If a patient’s fibroids are very large, a hysterectomy may even be in order.

Concerned? Give Us a Call!

If you suspect that you may have fibroids, don’t wait for the condition to get worse—contact your local gynecologist to seek relief and boost your health!

By CornerstoneMD
February 26, 2019
Category: Weight Loss

Weight loss is no easy task—especially when it comes to those last 10 pounds. Though diet and exercise is the best way to a new you, Physician Guided Weight Losssometimes, you may need help from your doctor to both achieve and maintain your goal weight. Read on to learn more about the physician-guided weight loss provided by Dr. Carolyn Ross Riley at Corner Stone MD in Dallas, TX.

What is physician-guided weight loss?
Physician-guided weight loss with Metrim MD gives you the extra help you need when losing extra weight and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. With customized care plans, nutritional counseling, and, if necessary, medications, not only can you lose your extra weight safely, but you can learn the importance of proper nutrition and exercise to keep it off, lower your body mass index (BMI), and reach your goals to feel great about the way you look.

Am I a candidate for physician-guided weight loss?
A good candidate for physician-guided weight loss with Metrim MD knows their weight loss goals in advance and has a clear target for how much weight they want to lose and by when they want to lose it. Maintaining a healthy weight is about a lifestyle change, not a one-time diet—accordingly, patients should be willing to commit to their plan, especially after they begin to see results.

Physician-Guided Weight Loss in Dallas, TX
If you have tried unsuccessfully to lose weight in the past or do not know the best way to do so, talk to your doctor about physician-guided weight loss. Together, you can come up with a weight loss plan to achieve your goal weight and safely lead a healthier lifestyle!

For more information on physician-guided weight loss, please contact Dr. Carolyn Ross Riley at Corner Stone MD in Dallas, TX. Call (469) 801-8480 to schedule your appointment with Dr. Riley today!

By CornerstoneMD
February 14, 2019
Category: Women's Healthcare
Tags: pap smear  

Why are Pap Smears Necessary?

If you are age 21 or older, you may be asked to get a pap smear. It’s also called a pap test, and it’s a common procedure used to test for cervical cancer in women. It is a routine procedure performed in the office during which cells are collected from your cervix.

Cervical cancer is a serious condition which often has no symptoms initially, until it’s in the later stages. A pap smear is a vital tool in detecting cervical cancer in the early stages, when treatment outcomes are much better. A pap smear can also find changes in your cervical cells which may indicate cancer developing at some point in the future.

When you reach age 21 or older, your doctor may recommend a pap test, usually performed along with a pelvic examination. In some cases, the pap test is combined with an HPV (human papillomavirus) which is a sexually transmitted condition known to cause cervical cancer.

The pap smear recommendations for healthy women are:

  • The first pap smear at age 21
  • A pap smear every 3 years if you are ages 21 to 65
  • A pap smear every 5 years if combined with an HPV test and you are age 30 or older

Having more frequent pap smears may be indicated if you have risk factors, including:

  • An HIV infection
  • An abnormal pap smear showing precancerous cells
  • A history of smoking
  • A weakened immune system due to organ transplant, chemotherapy, or corticosteroid use

To get ready for a pap smear, there are certain guidelines you should follow. Remember to:

  • Avoid having sexual intercourse, using a douche, or any vaginal medications or spermicidal products including foams, creams, or gels for at least 2 days before your test.
  • Avoid scheduling a pap smear during your menstrual period

A pap smear is a necessary part of protecting women’s health. The test is important because it is the only definitive way to diagnose cervical cancer in the early stages. Early diagnosis is critical to early treatment, which can lead to a better outcome for you.

By CornerstoneMD
February 05, 2019
Category: OBGYN

Treating Irregular Periods

Irregular periods are common when you first start menstruating. It’s common for them to be early or late, but as you get older, your menstrual cycle should become more regular, with the average length of the cycle lasting 28 days.

You have chronic irregular periods if:

  • The length of your menstrual cycle keeps changing
  • Your periods are coming early or late
  • You experience severe abdominal pain and very heavy bleeding during your period

There are many causes of irregular periods, including:

  • Puberty, pregnancy, or menopause
  • Contraceptive measures including the pill or intrauterine device
  • Extreme weight fluctuations, excessive exercise, or stress
  • Medical conditions including thyroid issues, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, or polycystic ovary syndrome

You should see a doctor if:

  • Your periods are suddenly irregular and you are under age 45
  • Your periods are more frequent than 21 days
  • Your periods are less frequent than 35 days
  • Your periods last longer than 7 days
  • You have severe abdominal pain and heavy bleeding with your periods
  • You are trying to have a baby, but you have irregular periods

There are several ways to treat irregular menstruation. The first step is determining what is causing it. If it is due to a medical issue like thyroid problems, medication or treatment of the underlying condition is vital. Additional treatment measures include:

  • Losing weight, if irregular menstruation is due to being overweight
  • Hormonal therapies, including birth control to regulate menstruation
  • Surgical therapy, if irregular menstruation is due to uterine fibroids or other structural issue.

There is also a 5-year intrauterine device known as Mirena, which can lessen bleeding. It also works as a contraceptive. Your doctor can help you decide which treatment option is best for you.

Irregular menstruation may be self-limiting, but it may go on for months or years. It can affect your life, especially if you are trying to get pregnant. It can also be a sign of a serious underlying condition. It’s important to seek out your doctor to find the cause, protect your health, and give you peace-of-mind.

By CornerstoneMD
January 15, 2019
Category: Women's Healthcare
Tags: Bladder Infection  

Bladder infections have a way of making themselves known. You may be making multiple trips to the bathroom, feeling like you constantly have to go again. But once you’re in there, you may feel burning or stinging every time you pee. That’s the most distinct sign of a bladder infection.

What is a bladder infection?

A bladder infection is a type of urinary tract infection or UTI. This is an infection anywhere in the urinary tract, like the bladder, kidneys, or urethra. Usually, bladder infections are acute, which means that they occur suddenly. They can sometimes be chronic, which means that they recur over a long term.

Bladder infections are caused by bacteria that enter through the urethra and move into the bladder. Normally, the body can remove the bacteria by flushing them out during urination. However, bacteria can sometimes attach to the walls of the bladder and multiply quickly. Infections can occur when bacteria from the stool get onto the skin and enter the urethra. This is common with women since the urethra is short and the outer opening isn’t far from the anus.

Symptoms of Bladder Infections

The symptoms of a bladder infection may vary between people, depending on the severity of the infection. Some common symptoms include:

  • Pain or burning while urinating

  • Cloudy or bloody urine

  • Frequent urination

  • Foul-smelling urine

  • Cramping in the lower abdomen or lower back

Treating and Preventing Bladder Infections

Bladder infections are treated with antibiotics to kill the bacteria causing the bladder infection. Your doctor may prescribe medication to help relieve the symptoms associated with the bladder infection.

There are many things that you can do in order to prevent bladder infections, such as:

  • Drink six to eight glasses of water daily

  • Drink cranberry juice daily

  • Urinate as soon as you feel the need, don’t hold it

  • Take showers instead of baths

  • Wear cotton underwear and loose-fitting clothes

  • Avoid using a diaphragm or spermicide

See Your Doctor Today

Don’t live with the pain of a bladder infection any longer. Call your doctor today to schedule an appointment or ask any questions about bladder infections!





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North Dallas, TX Gynecologist CornerStone MD 12222 N Central Expressway Suite 140 Dallas, TX 75243 (469) 801-8480